BIDMC’s Pandolfi to receive cancer research award

first_imgCancer geneticist Pier Paolo Pandolfi at Harvard-affiliated Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) is the recipient of the 2011 Pezcoller Foundation-AACR (American Association of Cancer Research) International Award for Cancer Research. This is the second time in the award’s 14-year history that a BIDMC investigator has received this prestigious honor, which was established in 1997 to recognize a scientist of international renown who has made a major scientific discovery in either basic or translational cancer research and whose ongoing work holds promise for progress in the field of cancer.Pandolfi joined the BIDMC faculty in 2007, and he serves as chief of the division of genetics in the department of medicine, director of research in the BIDMC Cancer Center, and director of the cancer genetics program. The George C. Reisman Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Pandolfi was recognized by the foundation and the AACR both for his outstanding work in the field of cancer genetics and for his groundbreaking development of cancer mouse models.“Dr. Pandolfi’s research has led to major breakthroughs in our essential understanding of how mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes result in leukemias, lymphomas, and solid tumors,” said BIDMC Cancer Center Director Lewis Cantley, who received the Pezcoller award in 2005. “His pioneering work in developing transgenic mouse models of cancer helped lead to novel therapeutic strategies for acute promyelocytic leukemia [APL], and, today, this unique expertise in mouse-model engineering is helping to speed the clinical testing of new personalized cancer therapies.”Pandolfi will deliver an award lecture titled “The Non-Coding Revolution: A Coding-Independent Function of Gene and Pseudogene mRNAs Regulates Tumor Biology” during the 102nd Annual Meeting of the AACR in Orlando, Fla., this spring.last_img read more

Vermonters pay relatively low car repair costs

first_img11.Utah$373.50 1.Arizona$421.49 25.Kansas$350.86 New Mexico$406.81  (14% higher than U.S. avg.)$240.59  (13% higher than U.S. avg.)$166.22  (16% higher than U.S. avg.) 16.Connecticut$366.79 California$394.49  (11% higher than U.S. avg.)$227.39  (7% higher than U.S. avg.)$172.30  (20% higher than U.S. avg.) 48.Wisconsin$298.76 CarMD ranking of states/districts with the lowest car repair costs in 2010: StateAverage Cost  (Parts & Labor)Average  Parts CostAverage  Labor Cost D.C. $265.29  (25% lower than U.S. avg.)$163.09  (23% lower than U.S. avg.)$102.20  (29% lower than U.S. avg.) Missouri $297.27  (17% lower than U.S. avg.)$160.76  (24% lower than U.S. avg.)$136.51  (5% lower than U.S. avg.) 24.Kentucky$350.86 37.South Carolina$336.97 Colorado$397.83  (12% higher than U.S. avg.)$244.91  (15% higher than U.S. avg.)$152.92  (6% higher than U.S. avg.) 43.New Hampshire$318.14 12.New York$370.98 32.Delaware$343.62 14.Idaho$368.17 36.Vermont$337.88 4.California$394.49 22.Florida$352.98 6.Washington$386.62 7.Hawaii$385.54 RankingStateAverage Car Repair Costs (Parts & Labor) 23.Iowa$352.98 17.Oregon$364.79 Other key findings:Six of the 10 states with the lowest car repair costs are from the Midwest, including Nebraska,Wisconsin, Ohio, Missouri, Indiana and Minnesota.The states with lower repair costs had more gas cap-related problems. A loose gas cap, which is one of the most common causes for check engine problems, accounted for nearly 12% of repairs in D.C. and 11% in Ohio. Loose, damaged or missing gas caps are an inexpensive fix but cause 147 million gallons of gas to evaporate annually.More than 12% of the repairs in D.C. were made at zero cost in terms of parts and labor charges, likely because of a higher number of vehicles that are new or under manufacturer’s warranty.Several states with lower repair costs had a substantial number of repairs that did not require any parts at all, including Missouri (26%) and Wisconsin (21%). Some of these repairs were made under warranty at no charge, while others were “check engine” light issues that could be fixed with a simple adjustment such as “tighten gas cap,” “adjust idle,” “remove aftermarket alarm” and “clean throttle body.”Drivers in Alaska paid the most ($268.22) for oxygen sensor replacement, which was the no. 1 most common repair in the country in 2010. O2 sensors monitor the amount of unburned oxygen in the exhaust and tell a car’s computer how much fuel to inject for proper operation. If a faulty O2 sensor is not repaired, the car’s fuel economy will dramatically drop. The average cost to replace an O2 sensor is $238.71, including parts and labor, but can lead to as much as a 40% reduction in gas mileage.The CarMD State-by-State ranking of average repair costs was derived from analysis of roughly 80,000 repairs made from Jan. 1, 2010 through Dec. 31, 2010 by CarMD’s network of Automotive Service Excellence-certified technicians.  The Census Regions and Divisions of the U.S. map was used for regional data calculations.  The repairs are all related to a vehicle’s “check engine” system, which is designed to alert drivers to large and small problems that affect emissions output and drivability. This technology is standard on all vehicles manufactured since 1996 and covers an estimated 80% of systems on cars, trucks, SUVs and minivans ‘ foreign and domestic. The CarMD database and average cost of repair findings does not include repairs of problems that are not associated with a vehicle’s on-board diagnostic computer such as tires, brakes and mechanical parts such as belts and hoses.About CarMDThe mission of Fountain Valley, Calif.-based CarMD.com Corporation is to empower consumers and the vehicle market by providing the tools and information needed to make better-educated decisions about their vehicles’ health and maintenance. An ISO 9001:2008-certified company, CarMD’s premiere product is the CarMD® Vehicle Health Systemâ ¢. The company has also built the largest, most up-to-date database of diagnostic trouble codes; expert fixes and repair costs, which it uses to compile the annual CarMD® Vehicle Health Indexâ ¢. For more information about common car repair problems and costs, visit, visithttp://corp.carmd.com(link is external). For information about the company, its products and other consumer tips, visitwww.CarMD.com(link is external).(Attached is a complete ranking of U.S. states in order of most to least expensive car repair costs in 2010)Average “Check Engine” Light Car Repair Costs ‘ 2010  (Source: CarMD.com Corp.) 39.Arkansas$334.35 35.Virginia$337.88 50.Missouri$297.27 15.Massachusetts$367.07 31.Maine$344.68 29.Texas$347.25 13.Alabama$368.85 In 2010, drivers in Arizona paid the most in the nation for car repairs at an average cost of $421.49, according to CarMD.com Corporation, which analyzed roughly 80,000 repairs made on vehicles with “check engine” light problems in 2010. Vermont ranked 33rd.Arizona’s no. 1 ranking is 18% more than the U.S. average for overall costs and 23% more for parts. Drivers in theDistrict of Columbia, which is one of the wealthiest areas in the country (according to the most recent U.S. Census Bureau), paid the least at $265.29 per transaction. CarMD also found that drivers in New Jersey pay closest to the national average for car repair costs at $357.32, just a dollar more than the U.S. average. According to the first annual CarMD® Vehicle Health Indexâ ¢, the average cost of U.S. “check engine”-related auto repairs in 2010 was $356.04, including $212.44 in parts and $143.61 in labor costs.”Through comprehensive data collected via CarMD’s nationwide network of Automotive Service Excellence-certified technicians, we are able to provide national and state-by-state transparency into vehicle repair costs,” said Art Jacobsen, vice president, CarMD.com Corporation. “We are releasing this data to empower consumers and technicians with a better understanding of common repairs and costs, and to call attention to the fact that, regardless of region, drivers who follow a regularly scheduled maintenance program and address small problems early tend to have reduced fuel bills and repair costs.  That said, if you live in a state with harsh weather conditions such as Arizona’s heat or North Dakota’s cold, it’s imperative to take care of your car to avoid catastrophic vehicle failures.”Several interesting highlights emerge when comparing costs and ranking repairs for each state. WhileArizona’s no. 1 ranking can be attributed to warm, dry weather, which wreaks havoc on the longevity of a car’s parts, it is surprising to see Arizona’s average parts costs at 23% higher, and California’s labor costs 20% higher than the U.S. average. Western states round out the top five most expensive spots, with only three non-western states listed in the top 10, including North Dakota at no. 8, Rhode Island at no. 9 andSouth Dakota at no. 10. Drivers in the western U.S. paid about 13% more than drivers in the Midwest, 11% more than drivers in the Southeast and 5% more than those in the Northeast for repairs. Labor costs in the West tend to be higher due to dry air, build up and dust, such as clogged mass airflow sensor, which occurs more frequently and increases costs. Milder temperatures in Western states also allows for more year-round driving, which leads to added wear and tear.The following is the ranking of the top 5 states with the highest car repair costs in 2010, according to CarMD:center_img 21.New Jersey$357.32 Ohio $298.49  (16% lower than U.S. avg.)$175.24  (18% lower than U.S. avg.)$123.26  (14% lower than U.S. avg.) 38.Oklahoma$335.49 10.South Dakota$374.61 26.North Carolina$349.34 Wisconsin $298.76  (16% lower than U.S. avg.)$170.88  (20% lower than U.S. avg.)$127.88  (11% lower than U.S. avg.) 41.Montana$325.56 StateAverage Cost  (Parts & Labor)Average  Parts CostAverage  Labor Cost 28.Louisiana$347.46 42.Minnesota$318.54 20.Maryland$358.45 18.Pennsylvania$362.90 19.Illinois$361.56 Nevada$393.96  (11% higher than U.S. avg.)$227.08  (7% higher than U.S. avg.)$166.89  (16% higher than U.S. avg.) 40.Wyoming$330.88 2.New Mexico$406.81 3.Colorado$397.83 47.Nebraska$301.79 5.Nevada$393.96 44.Indiana$317.33 Arizona$421.49  (18% higher than U.S. avg.)$260.29  (23% higher than U.S. avg.)$161.20  (12% higher than U.S. avg.) 27.Michigan$348.03 9.Rhode Island$384.24 8.North Dakota$384.67 34.Georgia$338.31 45.Tennessee$316.64 Nebraska $301.79  (15% lower than U.S. avg.)$179.00  (16% lower than U.S. avg.)$122.79  (14% lower than U.S. avg.) 46.Mississippi$315.43 49.Ohio$298.49 33.Alaska$339.06 30.West Virginia$345.00 51.District of Columbia$265.29 FOUNTAIN VALLEY, Calif., June 30, 2011 /PRNewswire/ —last_img read more

WAIVER EXTENSION, REVISED TIMING OF ENFORCEMENT: Monday, March 23 at 8:00 AM

first_imgWAIVER EXTENSION, REVISED TIMING OF ENFORCEMENT: Monday, March 23 at 8:00 AM SHARE Email Facebook Twitter March 20, 2020center_img Press Release,  Public Health,  Public Safety Updated Business GuidanceBusiness Waiver Application FormFAQ on Business Guidance Harrisburg, PA – Due to the high volume of waiver requests, the Wolf Administration is delaying enforcement of Governor Tom Wolf’s order and the Secretary of Health’s order that all non-life-sustaining businesses in Pennsylvania must close their physical locations to slow the spread of COVID-19.Per Governor Wolf’s and Dr. Levine’s orders, businesses that were non-life sustaining were ordered to close their physical locations on March 19, at 8:00 PM. This order stands, only the enforcement timing will change and become effective on Monday, March 23, at 8:00 AM.Those businesses requesting clarification on whether they are defined as life-sustaining should check this list, email the Department of Community and Economic Development (DCED) customer service resource account at [email protected], or call 1-877-PA-HEALTH and select option 1 to reach DCED staff. For businesses that determine from the list that they are non-life sustaining, but would like to seek a waiver, there is an online waiver application.When a business completes a waiver form, a team of professionals at DCED will review each request and respond based on the guiding principle of balancing public safety while ensuring the continued delivery of critical infrastructure services and functions. Those requesting a waiver will be notified via email if their operations may re-open. Businesses applying for a waiver must remain closed until a decision is made about their application.DCED offers working capital loans that could be of assistance to businesses impacted by COVID-19. Resources and information will be posted to http://dced.pa.gov/resources as they become available. Yesterday, Governor Wolf announced the availability of low-interest loans for small businesses and eligible non-profits in all 67 counties in Pennsylvania through the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19, Pennsylvanians should follow www.governor.pa.gov and www.doh.pa.gov.last_img read more

Low-interest loans available for flood, storm victims

first_imgBrookville, In. — President Trump has declared 18 Ohio counties as primary natural disaster areas.  As a result, Franklin County was declared a contiguous disaster due to severe storms, flooding and landslides that occurred February 14, 2018, through February 25, 2018.  Under this designation, producers with operations in any primary or contiguous county are eligible to apply for low-interest emergency loans.Emergency loans help producers recover from production and physical losses due to drought, flooding and other natural disasters or quarantine.Producers have eight months from the date of the declaration to apply for emergency loan assistance. FSA will consider each loan application on its own merits, taking into account the extent of losses, security available and repayment ability. Producers can borrow up to 100 percent of actual production or physical losses, to a maximum amount of $500,000.For more information about emergency loans, you may contact the Decatur County Farm Loan Program staff at 812-663-8674.  This office is located in Greensburg Indiana and provides funding for Franklin County through Farm Loan Programs.  You may also visit online.last_img read more

Tropical Depression forms as Tropical Wave Churns South of Florida

first_imgCloser to home, a tropical wave is churning just south of Florida, and over Cuba and it has a 30% chance of development over the next two days. However, hurricane specialists predict the storm will continue northwest and miss Florida. Tropical Depression Seven has formed between the African coast and the Lesser Antilles and could be upgraded to Tropical Storm Gonzalo today. Currently maximum sustained winds are 35 mph with higher gusts. There’s no threat to land at this point.last_img