Daily news from New Zealand – 20 October – Video

first_imgAUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – AUGUST 31: Imanol Harinordoquy of the French IRB Rugby World Cup 2011 team arrives at Auckland International Airport on August 31, 2011 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Hannah Johnston/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Imanol Harinordoquy shares his thoughts on the RWC FinalIn today’s RWC Daily we hear Tana Umaga’s thoughts on the final, as well as catch up with the referee in charge of the Final, Craig Joubert, and France’s Imanol Harinordoquy.last_img read more

The Craig Chalmers Column

first_img RESULTS AREN’T coming for Scotland but head coach Vern Cotter hasgot my backing. Even after four successive Six Nations defeats, I can see that things are moving forward.The New Zealander has brought a lot to the party. He plays his cards close to his chest but the players have massive respect for him, similar to the respect we had for Jim Telfer in my day. Scott Johnson (his predecessor) was more flamboyant and it was hard forplayers to read him.We could have beaten France, and should have beaten Wales and Italy. Expectations have been high and, until Italy, performances much improved. The former Scotland and Lions fly-half analyses his nation’s performance during the RBS Six Nations and calls for one major change Down and out? Chalmers says Scotland need to replace Greig Laidlaw as captain. (Photo: Inpho) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS We lack real leadership in the team, and I’d give the captaincy to a younger player. Greig Laidlaw, the current captain, isn’t the best player in his position. He knows the game well and kicks his goals, but he slows the ball down a lot. Speeding the game up with the ‘tap and go’, like Gary Armstrong used to do, doesn’t come naturally to him.To find out who Chalmers thinks should captain Scotland for the Rugby World Cup, you can read the rest of his exclusive column in the April edition of Rugby World magazine, which is on sale now. To subscribe to the print or digital edition, click herelast_img read more

Can Matt Symons complete his incredible journey?

first_img TAGS: London Irish His memories of playing for the Chiefs are ones to cherish. “One of the hardest but also best matches was against the Stormers at Newlands. Both of us were unbeaten and it was a sell-out. Because of the whole apartheid issue, Kiwi teams have a lot of fans in Cape Town, so it was almost a 50:50 crowd. It was 30-plus degrees, a tough game and we came out on top.“We had Sonny (Bill Williams), who’s Muslim. We had security coming out at the airport, people climbing up poles and telephone boxes. All the teams get security but we had people camped outside our hotel because of the All Blacks in our team and Sonny in particular. There’d be people getting out of cars to get your autographs. When we came to the stadium people were cheering and afterwards what seemed like a thousand people surrounded the coach. It was just madness.”High five: Congratulating Chiefs team-mate Aaron Cruden for a winning kick last February (Pic: Getty)Fans sometimes ask him what it was like locking down with Brodie Retallick, a former World Rugby Player of the Year, but Symons says: “People always single him out but it’s not just him. The way they develop their squad in the All Black environment, there’s a lot of parts to that puzzle. Everyone does their role really well to allow Brodie to make those decisions: a good carry on the other side of the pitch, a good clean, good distribution.“And that’s not necessarily the style all teams should play with. It works very well for the All Blacks but you couldn’t replicate that in many teams because of their (superior) skill-sets, and physically as well.”With former Chiefs coach Tom Coventry now head man at London Irish, the Exiles could never be accused of neglecting their skills work. But nor are they putting the cart before the horse. “There are parts to our game we’ve got to get right first, and ultimately that was always what the Chiefs did, as well as the All Blacks,” Symons says.“Rugby’s a physical game, it’s a contact game, you’ve got to win the gain-line. There’s no point being able to throw a 20-metre spin pass as a prop if you’re not scrummaging. So you’ve got to do your core roles and get that dealt with first before you worry about the X-factor.”Falcons testAs we know, Symons heeded Rowntree’s advice and came home to Irish, whom he is captaining in the long-term absence of George Skivington. This weekend’s match is a massive one, Irish hosting a Newcastle team sitting one place and two points above them in the table.The Exiles make two changes to the side beaten at Gloucester last week, with Jebb Sinclair replacing Blair Cowan in the back row and Topsy Ojo being named at full-back. Newcastle, seeking their first league win at the Madejski Stadium since 2009, bring in Scotland hooker Scott Lawson and tighthead Paddy Ryan, and their bench features Andy Goode – five months after he pulled out of a London Irish contract for medical reasons.Symons will relish the occasion. His journey shows that you don’t have to follow the conventional route of academy and/or age-grade rugby to reach the top – some people are simply late developers. But you still need people to back you.“Scott Robertson was the guy who gave me my biggest break. I owe him a lot. He was the head coach at Canterbury who offered me a contract for two years, for the ITM Cup.“All I wanted was an opportunity, to maybe get a good reference off a coach to then come back and play here. To help me here, to help me anywhere.” Rejected in his teens, the London Irish skipper has taken a circuitous route to Premiership rugby and is now pushing for England inclusion. Alan Pearey reports LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Now 26, he is showing the defensive tenacity and lineout authority that served him so well in Super Rugby. Eddie Jones is spoilt for choice for English second-rows but Symons is making a case for inclusion in the squad announced next week. And if doesn’t happen then, maybe it will next time. You can be sure he will never give up.No way through: Symons made 25 tackles against Wasps at Twickenham, with no misses (Pic: Getty)London Irish v Newcastle Falcons, Sunday 10 January (kick-off 1pm), live on BT Sport Not the least of Graham Rowntree’s achievements during his time with England was a chat he had in New Zealand during England’s 2014 summer tour. It was there that he met Matt Symons, the 6ft 7in Chiefs lock, and convinced him that it may be in his interests to find himself a Premiership contract.Last year Symons became eligible for the All Blacks but he is as English as jellied eels, having been born in Essex and raised in Hertfordshire. Had Saracens not rejected the once gangly teenager – “I played a couple of games for their academy side but they didn’t feel I was up to it” – then maybe Symons would now be enjoying life at the top of the Premiership instead of staring up from the bottom with London Irish.To some extent it was that very rejection that fuelled his ambition, but the desire to do something special with his life was already deep within him. “I was a driven kid,” he says. “For me, I have fun when I’m being successful.”Thus it was that when his mum read a newspaper ad appealing for tall, gifted athletes interested in becoming an elite rower, Symons jumped at the chance.“The way it was pitched to me was, ‘If you get on this programme, you’ll have a good shot at making the (2012) Olympics’. I knew nothing about rowing but that appealed to me. And I took that option over playing men’s club rugby at a lower-league side, which a lot of kids do. I wanted to grasp that opportunity.”Burning the midnight oilSymons got through the testing and, at 18, moved to Reading to train full-time. The training was brutal but he was meeting the demands of the programme when he suffered a new setback – arm injuries that, even after surgery, forced him to quit the sport at 21.Undaunted, he returned to rugby, working his way into Esher’s Championship team whilst studying for a geography degree at Reading. “I was driving an hour and an half each way (to the club) and it was pretty tiring,” he says. Most students don’t get beyond the campus bar.In yet more startling shows of initiative, Symons contacted every Premiership club in search of a contract and, when that plan drew a blank, flew to New Zealand – the day after his finals – to play club rugby for High School Old Boys in Christchurch. Aaron Mauger and Reuben Thorne were the coaches, which tells you everything you need to know about the standard. Symons sometimes locked down with Thorne in the engine room.An Englishman abroad: In action for Christchurch club High School Old Boys in 2012 (Pic: Getty Images)“It’s a good level. You’ve got guys farming, working 50-hour weeks, who just want to play amateur rugby, you’ve got young guys coming through who want to play for the All Blacks, you’ve got professional players dropping down. In New Zealand if you’re not playing for your ITM Cup team or Super Rugby team, you’re still turning out every week for your club side. It’s the thing that keeps them so grounded because ultimately they just want to play rugby.”Symons felt comfortable in such company and when Canterbury were looking around to top up their ITM Cup squad, they gave him a call. In 2014 he was offered a two-year contract and soon he was captaining a Crusaders Development team containing the likes of Owen Franks and Ryan Crotty. “I was having to give a talk and I’d never even played an ITM Cup game,” he says.He soon put that right and, continuing his heady journey in pro sport, in next to no time was being signed by the Chiefs franchise that had just won back-to-back Super Rugby titles.“I thought as an Englishman going over there that there would be a lot more obstacles, but they didn’t bat an eyelid the whole time. I could have been Kiwi, Japanese, anything, it wouldn’t have mattered.“There are a few more English people over there than you think, but my advice (to aspiring young players) is go for it. Go to Australia as well. Go to South Africa. Why not? Even from just from a lifestyle point of view, why not?”Sonny mania Climbing frame: Symons rises above Courtney Lawes during Irish’s win over Saints (Pic: Action Images) last_img read more

Six Nations: Ireland 19-9 France

first_imgDejection: Yoann Huget shows his frustration at the final whistle. Photo: Getty ImagesThey have shown signs of escaping the malaise that has affected French rugby in recent years but if they are to start challenging for the title again they need to be performing consistently and maintaining intensity for 80 minutes, not playing in patches here and there and losing their structure.Battle for 2023 – The pre-match ‘entertainment’ involved the screening of Ireland’s  video for their 2023 World Cup campaign and they also had a huge banner on the pitch during the anthems to promote their bid to host the tournament. France took a different approach and emblazoned their campaign logo on the players’ match shirts as they are also in the race to host RWC 2023.STATISTICS23 – Carries made by CJ Stander, ten more than the top Frenchmen, Gael Fickou and Louis Picamoles both with 13.18 – Tackles made by Kevin Gourdon, more than any other player.8 – Line breaks made by France, double the number made by Ireland. Yet Ireland beat more defenders, 16 to 14.9 – Turnovers made by France compared to four by Ireland.68% – Territory Ireland enjoyed, along with 64% possession.Ireland: R Kearney (A Trimble 51); K Earls, G Ringrose, R Henshaw, S Zebo; J Sexton (P Jackson 69), C Murray (K Marmion 78); J McGrath (C Healy 60), R Best (capt, N Scannell 68), T Furlong (J Ryan 74), D Ryan (I Henderson 60), D Toner, CJ Stander, S O’Brien (P O’Mahony 68), J Heaslip.Try: Murray. Con: Sexton. Pens: Sexton 2, Jackson. DG: Sexton.France: S Spedding (D Camara 74); Y Huget, R Lamerat (H Chavancy 60), G Fickou, N Nakaitaci; C Lopez; B Serin (M Machenaud 62); C Baille (U Atonio 51), G Guirado (capt, C Tolofua 62), R Slimani (E Ben Arous 51), S Vahaamahina (J Le Devedec 51), Y Maestri, B le Roux (C Ollivon 60), K Gourdon, L Picamoles. Star performer: Conor Murray was Man of the Match against France. Photo: Getty Images Ireland put together back-to-back wins to maintain their Six Nations title bid, with Conor Murray and Johnny Sexton pulling the strings for the men in green. France started strongly and took a 6-0 lead but Ireland gained control midway through the first half and maintained it for much of the remainder of the game. They even denied the French a losing bonus point with a late penalty. Ireland will now head to Cardiff to play Wales with confidence – but before that, here’s our verdict on the match…WHAT’S HOTKing Conor – Conor Murray was lauded across the world following his performance in Ireland’s win over New Zealand last year. His form in the first two rounds of the Six Nations was not at the same level but he showed against France why he is the favourite to wear the Lions No 9 shirt this summer. His game management was superb – box-kicking to relieve the pressure and producing accurate touch finders as well as delivering quick ball to his back-line. Whether the return of Johnny Sexton at ten had any affect on his display it’s hard to know, but Warren Gatland will no doubt have been pleased to see this Man of the Match performance.Loop the loop – The loop is one of the first moves you learn in rugby but it’s something you don’t see so often at the very top end of the modern game. Ireland used it to good effect against France, though. Johnny Sexton was creating space in the wider channels with a short pass to a team-mate and then collecting the return pass further out. He mixed up his game well with passes short and long as well as neat dinks behind; there was even a quick tap penalty and a drop-goal – you wouldn’t know he’d been out injured for a few weeks.Kick and flick: Johnny Sexton mixed up his game well against France. Photo: Getty ImagesAnd that was not the only way Ireland tested France’s defence. Yes, the likes of CJ Stander and Sean O’Brien made trademark surges but it was backs like Garry Ringrose and Rob Kearney hitting the line late and at sharp angles that caused the most damage, their arrival at pace often catching the French by surprise.Double act – Baptiste Serin is a relatively new arrival on the Test scene while Camille Lopez has been criticised in the past for his inconsistency, but the two half-backs are starting to form a very effective partnership for France. They weren’t equal to the excellence of Conor Murray and Johnny Sexton but they are certainly an improvement on what France have produced in recent years.Bright spark: Baptiste Serin scythes through the Irish defence. Photo: Getty ImagesSerin adds plenty of tempo – something les Bleus have been lacking in recent years – with his speed of pass and sniping runs. Lopez, meanwhile, is balancing his game well, putting in territory-gaining kicks and slotting goals when called upon but also picking the right time to release those outside him. It was just a shame they couldn’t keep it up for the whole match. The key is for Guy Noves to resist making changes and stick with this pairing so they can continue to build.Small but mighty – Mention must go to the two mascots who stood alongside Ireland captain Rory Best for the anthems. They belted out the words with as much aplomb as the players. Bravo!Fine voice: Ireland line up for the anthem with their two mascots. Photo: Getty ImagesWHAT’S NOTPressure, not points – Ireland had four kickable penalties in the first half but opted to kick none of them towards the posts. Okay, one resulted in Conor Murray’s try – the call for a five-metre scrum paying off when the No 9 got over the line. But the occasions they decided to go for the corner and back their lineout drive did not bear fruit.Once they knocked on and France got a penalty from the resulting scrum. On another occasion the French drove them back and won the turnover. We know Ireland have a strong mauling game, but in the first half of a tight Test match, are points on the board not more important? For all the pressure and possession they had in the second quarter, they had only seven points to show for it.Close range: Conor Murray burrows over for Ireland’s try. Photo: Getty ImagesInterestingly, in the second half they generally kicked their goals. Captain Rory Best said the change in tack was down to the fact the kicks were from easier positions, in front of the posts, and it didn’t cost them a victory in this match – but it will be interesting to see what strategy they employ against Wales, who have also been turning down kicks at goal in this championship.French inconsistency – France started this game at full throttle, attacking from deep and putting pressure on in the Irish 22. They even made it across the whitewash, only for a knock-on to be spotted in the build-up and the try ruled out by the TMO, and they did notch six points through two Camille Lopez penalties. Yet they then drifted out of the game, not really venturing into Ireland’s 22 in the middle half and not putting a point on the board for 57 minutes. Pens: Lopez 3.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.center_img The good and the bad from Ireland’s 2017 Six Nations win over France in Dublin LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Pacific Islands pro rugby takes a step forward

first_imgFormer  Samoa and All Blacks star Sir Michael Jones – currently a board memeber with New Zealand Rugby, hailed the move. In a statement he said: “We are now on the cusp of realising a long-held desire to include Pasifika in our professional game and the opportunity to embrace all that comes with that.“With the approval of licences, Moana Pasifika and the Fijian Drua can now forge ahead with the final stages of their business plans and crucially start to lock in their playing and coaching rosters for next season. It’s an exciting time for rugby.”Fiji Rugby Union Chair Conway Begg also said of the move: “This is a big moment for the Drua and will provide the impetus for us to finalise our equity partners, appoint coaches, contract players and confirm our commercial partners. We are on the home stretch and excitement is building across Fiji.” Moana Pasifika and the Fijian Drua ger conditional licences for new competition Moana Pasifika before facing the Maori All Blacks (Getty Images) Pacific Islands pro rugby takes a step forwardIn a significant move for sport in the Pacific region, New Zealand Rugby have granted Moana Pasifika and the Fijian Drua conditional licences to join a planned new professional competition next year.Around five months ago, NZR confirmed that Moana Pasifika and Fijian Drua were their preferred partners for the journey of Pasifika-linked teams into future elite competitions. Today’s move signifies a major step toward those sides joining New Zealand‘s five Sky Super Rugby Aotearoa clubs and Rugby Australia‘s five Super Rugby AU teams in a new competition set to take place in 2022 – albeit, on condition of approving their final business plans and Rugby Australia giving their own stamp of approval. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Sudanese bishop calls for urgent action in war-affected Nuba Mountains

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Andudu Adam Elnail of the Diocese of Kadugli. Photo: Episcopal Church of Sudan[Anglican Communion News Service] A bishop from Sudan has appealed for emergency action for the people affected by the war in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains.Bishop of the Diocese of Kadugli, the Rt. Rev. Andudu Adam Elnail, said people, especially those from the villages of Kao Nyaro and Warne, are facing starvation and death due to the humanitarian crises in the South Kordofan State of Sudan.“Those who have managed to escape are now living under trees and getting soaked by the rains. They have no tents, no food, no safe drinking water, and no medicine,” he said. “Some organizations in the area have given them a little sorghum, which was not enough for all the people and some have already died.”Recently, the governor of Sudan’s South Kordofan state, Adam Al-Faki, described the ongoing war in his state as “intricate” because “it involves family members on both sides” and acknowledged that it would not stop without the spread of education.Thousands of people have been displaced since the conflict began in mid-2011. The latest reports reaching the bishop from Malakal, an area bordering Nuba Mountains and South Sudan, suggest that the humanitarian situation is reaching “catastrophic levels.”“People are still on the way walking from the Nuba Mountains to cross the boarder of South Sudan, which is a long distance with no food, causing the deaths of 20-25 people every day,” he said.“We are calling for support so that we can meet these people. We sent $17,000 three weeks ago, but it is not enough.”The bishop has since appealed to Christians all over the world to pray for the people of Nuba Mountains so that peace can prevail between the people and the government. He also called for prayer for himself and his term as they travel around their diocese.Fighting in the region continues, with the Sudanese Armed Forces and rebels making contradictory claims over who is winning the battles. But whether one end is winning or losing, it’s the people on the ground, especially women and children who continue to bear the brunt of the war. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Comments are closed. Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Africa, Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs By Bellah ZuluPosted Sep 19, 2013 Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Comments (1) Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Sudan & South Sudan The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab center_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Sudanese bishop calls for urgent action in war-affected Nuba Mountains Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Heidi Haverkamp says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 October 2, 2013 at 12:12 pm Is ERD involved? Is there a way we can we give to support the Bishop? Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Anglican Communion, Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NClast_img read more

Cámara de Obispos finaliza retiro de primavera ‘construyendo puentes’

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC [Episcopal News Service] La Cámara de Obispos de la Iglesia Episcopal casi finaliza el retiro anual de primavera el cual ha sido un tiempo para construir la comunidad y construir puentes.“No se puede trabajar tan eficazmente como colegas si además no somos amigos, y hay una importante relación emocional – relación espiritual – que se genera en estos encuentros y nos profundizamos en otros puntos de la vida de la Cámara de Obispos,” dijo el obispo de la Diócesis de Kansas  Dean Wolfe, vicepresidente de la Cámara de Obispos, el 25 de marzo durante conferencia de prensa telefónica.El obispo de la Diócesis del Este de Michigan Todd Ousley, copresidente del Comité de Planificación de la Cámara de Obispos, estuvo de acuerdo. “A medida que continuamos acogiendo la reunión de primavera como un tiempo de retiro y reflexión, estamos creciendo juntos más profundamente como una cámara en esa acogida con cada reunión sucesiva”, dijo.Los obispos, dijo Ousley, están “empezando a profundizar nuestro aprecio por los demás” y, a modo de escuchar las reflexiones de sus colegas, estamos construyendo puentes entre “nuestra espiritualidad personal y la espiritualidad de lo que significa ser un obispo que sirve en la iglesia en este momento”.El retiro comenzó el 21 de marzo en el centro de conferencia Allen Camp & Retreat Center en Navasota, Texas (Diócesis de Texas), y debe concluir el 25 de marzo después de una reunión estilo cabildo abierto y una sesión de trabajo corta, seguido de una Eucaristía de clausura y la cena.El obispo Ken Price, secretario de la Cámara de Obispos, dijo durante la conferencia de prensa dijo que el retiro ha tenido una de las presencias más importantes en los últimos años con 148 obispos asistentes. Señaló que la cámara ha cambiado mucho en los 20 años desde que él fue ordenado y consagrado, con la adición de 180 obispos durante ese tiempo.Durante sus reuniones de negocios, los obispos reconocen formalmente obispo sufragáneo jubilada de la Diócesis de Massachusetts Barbara Harris con una resolución en honor el 25 aniversario de su ordenación y consagración como la primera mujer obispo en la Comunión Anglicana.“A donde hemos llegado en ese momento es increíble”, dijo Price.En la apertura del día del retiro, la cámara escucho las exposiciones de dos estudios de mandato de la Convención General. El Rdo. Brian Taylor de Rio Grande y Joan Geiszler-Ludlum de Carolina del Este Carolina presentó el trabajo hasta la fecha del Equipo de Trabajo sobre el Estudio del Matrimonio. Y el, Equipo de Trabajo para Reimaginar la Iglesia Episcopal lo presento los miembros obispo Andy Doyle de Texas, obispa Mary Gray-Reeves de El Camino Real, obispo Sean Rowe de Pennsylvania del Noroeste/Bethlehem y el obispo Michael Curry de Carolina del Norte presentaron el Equipo de Trabajo hasta la fecha.“Ha habido mucha conversación sobre la necesidad de tener más tiempo para la conversación”, dijo la obispa presidente Katharine Jefferts Schori durante la conferencia de prensa de ambas presentaciones. “Sé que vamos a volver a las dos temas en nuestra reunión de otoño”Price dijo que, pese a la falta de tiempo para la discusión en profundidad y el reconocimiento de que el grupo de trabajo aún tiene mucho por hacer, hubo una ” recepción muy positiva” de lo que se presentó.Ousley dijo que ambas iniciativas “representan de una manera muy tangible un movimiento muy positivo por la iglesia en su conjunto en trabajar intencionalmente para recoger las voces de todo el pueblo de Dios en la iglesia sobre asuntos importantes”.“Encontrar oportunidades adecuadas ” para las voces de los laicos, diáconos, sacerdotes y obispos que se trajeron a la mesa es “parte de una gran tendencia que estamos viendo en la iglesia para tratar de ver cómo todos nosotros podemos estar juntos en la toma de decisiones, y en la lucha de cómo se desarrolla nuestro futuro”, dijo.Price estuvo de acuerdo y añadió que ” hay un sentimiento predominante de la gente de que estamos entrando en una época en la que tenemos que encontrar nuevas formas de ser en las relaciones que entre sí y que no sólo se debe preocupar por la legalidad de ser una Iglesia”.Se pidió a los obispos el costo del plan para celebrar su reunión de la cámara en septiembre en Taiwán. Jefferts Schori  indicó que la Diócesis de Taiwán es la parte más oriental de la Iglesia Episcopal y está celebrando su 60 aniversario este año.La invitación del obispo David Jung-Hsin de Lai “parecía una oportunidad notable para los obispos en esta iglesia para aprender algo sobre el contexto asiático en el que la iglesia tiene relaciones, y también sobre otras partes de la Iglesia Episcopal que está recibiendo migrantes”, ella dijo. “Es una oportunidad para ampliar sobre el tema en esta reunión, que está cantando las canciones del Señor en una tierra extraña. Sí, cuesta algo ir para allá. Cuesta un poco de cada obispo en términos de estar abiertos a nuevas experiencias y discernir la presencia de Dios en otros contextos”.Wolfe dijo que la cámara ha estado tratando de detener sus costos de las reuniones de este trienio y añadió que “de que la cuestión de que si vamos a ser una iglesia internacional o no lo vamos a ser, y que si lo somos va a… requerir algún costo en términos de gastos en viajes y como la obispa Katharine señaló también el costo de estar dispuesto a entablar nuevas culturas y experiencias diferentes”.El tema de la reunión de Taiwán será “la expansión de la imaginación apostólica”, dijo Ousley.“¿Qué mejor manera para nosotros para ampliar nuestra imaginación que estar dentro de una cultura que por su distancia nos fuerza a pensar de manera diferente, escuchar y oír de forma diferente, y ser capaz de traducir esas experiencias cuando regresemos a nuestra propia cultura? Estoy muy emocionado de que vamos a estar ahí “, dijo. “En lo que se refiere al costo, ser fiel en la iglesia no es sólo una cuestión económica, sino más bien se trata de a ¿quién está Dios llamando y qué es lo que Dios nos llama a hacer? Eso es siempre una parte de la ecuación que debemos de tener en cuenta”.La Oficina de Asuntos Públicos de la Iglesia Episcopal emitió reportes diarios que proporcionan una breve descripción de los debates y actividades de los obispos en Camp Allen. Esos reportes se encuentran aquí.A los miembros del público y los medios de comunicación no se les permitió observar las sesiones. Algunos obispos utilizaron el blog y tweet durante el retiro usando #hobspring14.Esos tweets pueden ser leídos aquí.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es una editora/reportera para Episcopal News Service. Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cámara de Obispos finaliza retiro de primavera ‘construyendo puentes’ Los obispos están “creciendo juntos más profundamente como cámara’ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Mar 27, 2014 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FLlast_img read more

In opening remarks, presiding officers urge church to take risks,…

first_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET General Convention, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem President of the House of Deputies, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori By Tracy SukrawPosted Jun 24, 2015 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags Rector Bath, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA The church’s journey ahead “requires courage – to venture into the unknown future, to befriend strangers, to confront whatever denies life and liveliness, and to keep learning interdependent ways of living,” Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori tells a joint session of the House of Deputies and House of Bishops on June 24, the day before General Convention’s official start. The horse balloon floats above the Diocese of Lexington’s deputation table. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceEditor’s note: On-demand video of the presiding officers’ remarks can be accessed by clicking here.[Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] Deputies and bishops gathered in the Salt Palace Convention Center for a joint session the morning of June 24 to hear opening remarks from Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings.The joint session, coming a day before the General Convention’s legislative business officially begins on June 25, set a collaborative context for the work ahead.With all that General Convention has to accomplish over the next nine days, both Jefferts Schori and Jennings focused on The Episcopal Church’s need to cross boundaries into new frontiers, even as it focuses on its institutional structure and governance.They urged risk taking, soul searching, courage and openness in the enterprise.Jefferts Schori described The Episcopal Church’s trek as “a missionary expedition,” using a space exploration analogy that played off the TREC acronym for the Task Force for Reimagining the Episcopal Church, whose restructuring proposals are a high-profile topic coming before General Convention.“There is abundant adventure ahead on this heavenward trek, and it asks our courage to engage unknown beings, new challenges and unexpected opportunities,” Jefferts Schori said.  “We’re bound for the galaxy called Galilee and the edges of the known world, because that’s where Jesus sent us and that’s where he promises to meet us.”She emphasized interdependence as the church’s vocation and destiny.“No one goes alone; together we care for those most in need.  Our growing understanding of human interrelationship with the rest of creation means conscious care for the earth and all its inhabitants, not just the human ones,” she said.She acknowledged “plenty of challenge ahead” for General Convention, and said that the decisions made in Salt Lake City “can help to build a more just and peaceful world,” she said.“This body is meant to be a sacrament of God, an outward demonstration of the life and hope within us,” she said.“We are on a missionary expedition, scattering seeds of life and love to the winds and across the earth.  There is abundant risk in such profligate sowing, for not all will take root and grow to harvest,” Jefferts Schori said, but nonetheless urged the church toward new ways of being and reaching out.“How will this body here in Salt Lake continue to foster that kind of sowing?” she asked.The text of the presiding bishop’s remarks is here.House of Deputies President the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings reminded the June 24 joint session of the House of Deputies and House of Bishops that both houses have a lot of work ahead of them before General Convention’s July 3 adjournment. “Not just meetings and hearings and legislative sessions, but also listening to each other and paying attention to what new things are arising among us,” she said. “Much of the work we have to do is about our own institutional future. But that’s not all of what we do.” Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceJennings, too, referenced how the church finds itself “standing on a boundary between the old and the new.”“Gathering here to wrestle with the future of our beloved Episcopal Church, we are standing on holy ground, straining to hear God speaking above all the noise,” she said.In preparation for the work ahead, “let’s quiet the din around us and listen for the new within ourselves,” she said, referencing a sermon by theologian Paul Tillich.“Let’s turn down the volume on the Pew Center’s statistics about the decline of the institutional church, the endless online arguments about what millennials really want and what one tweeter recently called the ‘church decline industrial complex.’  Let’s quiet our souls,” Jennings said.The church’s debate about what form its structure should take to enable mission is really about identity, she said.“We’re talking about our vision of the beloved community, and we are asking important questions.  Can we restructure in a way that inspires and energizes the people of our church?  Can we restructure in a way that continues to respect the gifts of all orders of ministry?  We are talking about who we are as the people of God if we are not the church we have always been,” she said.  “We’re talking about the fact that God isn’t done with us yet.”Wrestling with issues of the church’s institutional future is not the only work ahead, she reminded the gathering.“The church isn’t the only segment of our society that’s reeling right now,” Jennings said. “Income inequality is greater than it has been since 1928, our cities are besieged by gun violence and racial injustice, and too many young black men are caught in the school-to-prison pipeline.”“This summer, especially, we must repent” of not doing enough “to right the wrongs of discrimination, white privilege and inequality in the world around us,” Jennings said.“General Convention is where we Episcopalians have the ability not only to proclaim that black lives matter, but also to take concrete action toward ending racism and achieving God’s dream of racial reconciliation and justice.  We can do no less,” she said.The text of Jennings’ remarks is here.The June 24 joint session of the House of Deputies and House of Bishops met in the cavernous House of Deputies hall, which has enough space for close to 900 deputies and alternates, translators, a visitor gallery and space for media, international and other invited guests, and Executive Council members. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceThe joint session also heard from the Rev. Nancy Crawford, the president of the Executive Board of Episcopal Church Women, whose triennial meeting is held concurrently with General Convention.She reported on several ECW social justice efforts, including work over the past triennium to raise awareness of human trafficking — through support of Girls Educational & Mentoring Services, or GEMS, an education and mentoring service provider for girls and young women who have experienced sexual exploitation; support this year for the Homeless Youth Resource Center in Salt Lake City; and the ECW’s Women to Women project, which provides small micro-enterprise grants to women around the world.— Tracy J. Sukraw is part of the Episcopal News Service team covering convention. center_img General Convention 2015, Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In opening remarks, presiding officers urge church to take risks, soul search New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

Muestran iniciativas de ministerios ‘revolucionarios y radicales’ a la Iglesia…

first_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Muestran iniciativas de ministerios ‘revolucionarios y radicales’ a la Iglesia en este trienio Zonas de empresa de misión y comienzo de nuevas iglesias apuntan a la evangelización del siglo XXI An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 General Convention, Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jun 25, 2015 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bajo la mirada vigilante de anteriores obispos de Pensilvania, un grupo de “pioneros en el ministerio” se sienta en un círculo en la iglesia de Cristo, Filadelfia, y conversa sobre sus experiencias en las Zonas de Empresas de Misión y el proyecto de Comienzo de Nuevas Iglesias de la Iglesia Episcopal. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Nota de la redactora: Este es el último de una serie de artículos acerca de la promesa de la Iglesia Episcopal en la 77ª. Convención General de asociarse con diócesis para comenzar estrategias de misión innovadoras. Los artículos anteriores se encuentran aquí.[Episcopal News Service]  Los primeros tres años del proyecto de la Iglesia Episcopal de concederle mayor libertad a las personas que quieren tratar de llegar a nuevos creyentes de maneras nuevas han enseñado a sus participantes sobre la necesidad de asociaciones y diálogos regulares y la disposición de correr riesgos, estar abiertos a la transformación y de participar por un largo trayecto.“Lo que quiero que la gente sepa y comience a entender es cuán revolucionario y radical es esto”, dijo Anne Watkins, que preside desde hace poco el Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Misión Local y Comité del Ministerio del Consejo Ejecutivo.El comité sopesó las propuestas de los $2 millones que la Convención General asignó para iniciativas de Zonas de Empresas de Misión y Comienzo de Nuevas Iglesias en el presupuesto trienal de las Cinco Marcas de la Misión 2013-2015.Ahora, con poco más de seis meses para finalizar el trienio, Watkins le dijo a Episcopal News Service que le resulta claro que el proyecto “nos llama a ser fundamentalmente transformados porque tenemos que empezar por mirar las cosas y conversar y hablar y comportarnos de maneras que son radicalmente diferentes de las que estamos acostumbrados”.Los obispos y los diputados asignaron dinero para el proyecto como parte del compromiso de la Iglesia Episcopal con la primera de las Cinco Marcas de la Misión de la Comunión Anglicana: proclamar las buenas nuevas del reino.Las zonas se definieron en la resolución que las establecía (A073) como “un área geográfica, como un grupo de congregaciones o como toda una diócesis comprometida con la misión y la evangelización que interactúa con grupos subrepresentados, entre ellos jóvenes y jóvenes adultos, personas de color, pobres y gente de clase obrera, personas graduadas de escuela secundaria o menos y/o personas con poca o ninguna participación —o antecedente— en la iglesia”. Las zonas habían de tener planes estratégicos con líderes adiestrados en antirracismo, desarrollo comunitario intercultural, desarrollo del ministerio y evangelización. Los obispos y otras partes del liderazgo diocesano se esperaría que les concedieran a las zonas “mayor libertad” en lo que respecta a su estatus congregacional, la formación de liderazgo y los tipos de textos litúrgicos que podrían usarse.Había subvenciones de hasta $20.000 para una zona de empresa de misión y hasta $100.000 para comenzar una nueva iglesia. Las diócesis tenían que tener disponible un monto igual de dinero y estar dispuestas a equiparar las subvenciones. La lista completa de la primera ronda de subvenciones está aquí y la lista de la segunda ronda de subvenciones se encuentra aquí.En total se otorgaron 40 subvenciones, que van desde el Ministerio Latino a Guerreros del Sueño [Warriors for the Dream], un proyecto de beneficio comunitario en Harlem, y del Centro Comunitario Occidental Kairós [Kairos West Community Center] un centro comunitario en West Asheville, Carolina del Norte, hasta la Abadía [the Abbey] en Birmingham, Alabama, donde el lema es “Pecadores, Santos, Café”. En cuatro casos los episcopales se han asociado con colegas de otras denominaciones para realizar la labor.La Resolución A012 de la Convención General 2015 propone una continuidad de la financiación. Y el presupuesto del Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia propuso al comité del presupuesto de la Convención aumentar el capital inicial trienal disponible a $3 millones (véase aquí el renglón 27).Aprender de las experiencias del primer trienioWatkins, cuyo comité de Misión y Ministerio Locales se volcaron y oraron por cada propuesta para conseguir que los 40 fueran financiados, dijo que el proceso en su totalidad es radical por varias razones, entre ellas el hecho de que la Iglesia oficialmente se ha dispuesto a escuchar “las voces marginadas… tanto de las personas en nuestras parroquias como de las personas en la calle”. La disposición de la Iglesia de “brindarles nuestra confianza y que ellos sean tan capaces de percibir a Dios obrando tal como nosotros profesionales de la Iglesia; creo que es revolucionario porque no lo hacemos muy bien”.Ha sido un caso de “no sólo hablar del ministerio local o de la misión local o de la obra de Dios localmente, sino de entender en verdad que Dios está obrando localmente y no necesariamente dentro de nuestras estructuras institucionales”, afirmó.“Dios es mucho más grande que nuestras estructuras institucionales”, continuó Watkins. “Sé que decimos eso y lo creemos, y sé que usamos esas palabras y ciertamente confiamos que las personas en su fuero interno crean eso, y no obstante creo que nos sorprendemos incurriendo en conductas interiorizadas y aprendidas que se oponen enormemente a eso”.La Rda. Stephanie Spellers, que con Ora Houston copresidía la Comisión Permanente sobre la Misión y Evangelización de la Iglesia Episcopal durante el trienio 2010-2012, dijo que la experiencia mostraba que estas clases de iniciativas misionales necesitan apoyo de sus diócesis además de la ayuda de tipo económica.(Spellers; la Rda. Deborah Royals, que presidió la comisión en el trienio 2013-2015; y la miembro Megan Anderson formaron el subgrupo de la comisión que desarrolló el proyecto a partir de toda la información reunida durante un trienio de escucha).Después de las primeras dos rondas de Zonas de Empresas de Misión y Comienzo de Nuevas Iglesias, la Iglesia Episcopal tiene los “relatos de los líderes que se enamoraron de lo que Dios estaba haciendo en el mundo en torno a ellos, y ese era realmente el lugar de lanzamiento”, dice el Rdo. Tom Brackett, misionero para la plantación de iglesias y redesarrollo del ministerio de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Si bien “la disposición de la diócesis a contribuir ha sido alentadora” también resultó claro “que no pueden abandonarnos en un rincón sin un obispo y otras personas que entablen una conversación con nosotros”, dijo Spellers.Llevó tiempo para algunos de la diócesis conectarse con las nuevas iniciativas que se estaban creando en su medio, según Spellers, pero se propagó la noticia a través de la Iglesia, y otras diócesis que no hicieron propuestas de asociaciones en la nueva empresa se sintieron dejadas fuera.“Creo que es una buena señal cuando algo tiene bastante impacto que otra gente mire y pregunte, ‘¿cómo es que no tenemos una de esas zonas de empresas de misión?’”, dijo Spellers.Pero en este primer trienio, varias cosas comenzaron a surgir como temas, agregó Spellers, gracias en parte a la manera en que el Rdo. Tom Brackett reunió a los líderes de las iniciativas y, en ocasiones, a algunos de sus obispos y otros funcionarios diocesanos, para sostener conversaciones acerca de su quehacer. Brackett es el misionero de la DFMS para la plantación de iglesias y el redesarrollo del ministerio.(La Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society (DFMS) es el nombre legal y canónico con el cual la Iglesia Episcopal está incorporada, funciona empresarialmente y lleva a cabo la misión).Brackett dijo que su objetivo ha sido formar una comunidad de aprendizaje cuyos miembros pudieran “reducir el costo del fracaso” en el futuro al transmitir un conocimiento arduamente adquirido.Durante una reunión en abril en la iglesia de Cristo [Christ Church] en Filadelfia, la mayoría de los líderes de las iniciativas se reunieron para intervenir en una de esas discusiones. Una de las cosas que resultó clara, dijo Brackett, fue que a varios de los líderes “realmente no les gustaba la idea de que los vieran dirigiendo un experimento” porque algunos de ellos habían venido de otros estados para hacer este trabajo y no querían que la estructura diocesana los desenchufara después de tres años.Durante una reunión reciente en la iglesia de Cristo, en Filadelfia, los líderes del proyecto Zonas de Empresa de Misión y Comienzo de Nuevas Iglesias apuntaron en notas adhesivas una lección que les costó algo, y que ellos esperaban que al compartirla no le costara mucho a otros. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Los líderes llenaron parte de la pared de un salón de reuniones con notas adhesivas en las cuales apuntaron una lección que les costó algo y que ellos querían transmitir a otros con la esperanza de que los futuros líderes puedan evitar pagar ese precio. Una de las oraciones dice: “No importa cuando creas que sabes ni los muchos años que has estado en el ministerio, aún puedes ser capaz de recibir nuevos conocimientos con corazón humilde del que probablemente menos lo sospeches”.Mientras los líderes, a quienes Bracket llamó “pioneros en el ministerio”, se sentaban en un círculo y conversaban de sus experiencias, muchos advirtieron que sentían lo que uno de ellos llamó “aislamiento del día a día”.Sentados en el círculo exterior y escuchando esos comentarios estaban los participantes en la Conferencia de Ejecutivos Diocesanos de la Iglesia Episcopal, que también se reunieron en Filadelfia. “Ayúdenos a derribar los silos”, le pedía uno de los líderes de la iniciativa misional a los miembros de CODE.Otra dijo que se sentía agradecida por haberle “concedido la flexibilidad de intentar algo, que no había funcionado y luego volver e intentar otra cosa—en ocasiones ayudándola a recuperarse y probar algo más”.Una líder misional dijo que quería compartir con el grupo grande un asunto que había surgido con frecuencia en las discusiones en los grupos pequeños: cuán difícil es tener que dedicar la mayor parte del tiempo a recaudar dinero para su ministerio. “Nos preocupamos del dinero todo el tiempo”, dijo. “Tendríamos muchísima más libertad para ocuparnos del ministerio si eso fuera menos cierto”.Después que los miembros del CODE pasaron al círculo interno y los líderes misionales se mudaron al borde exterior, uno de los miembros del CODE dijo que los líderes diocesanos debían de escuchar las historias acerca de cómo esos ministerios están transformando vidas. “Ayúdennos a adquirir nuevos ojos”, dijo otro.Encontrar un nueva forma de medir la misión y el ministerio de la IglesiaLos proyectos también han vuelto a suscitar la debatida nueva cuestión de si el informe parroquial anual que toda congregación de la Iglesia debe presentar, mide realmente la totalidad de la misión y ministerio de una congregación.“Ahora mismo, yo creo que nuestro informe no nos permite levantarnos y celebrar y aprender de” las experiencias ministeriales de congregaciones, dijo Spellers. “[Ese informe] tiende a inclinarse hacia lo que obtienen las cifras”, recalcó ella. No quiere decir que los números no importen. Yo tampoco estoy necesariamente en ese campo”.Ella y otros quieren que la Iglesia celebre tanto la congregación pequeña y nueva que están entablando “una nueva conversación respecto a quién es Jesús y cómo vivimos en su cuerpo” y la parroquia de 2000 miembros con todos sus ministerios.El Rdo. Andrew Green, presidente del Comité sobre el Estado de la Iglesia de la Cámara de Diputados, dijo que su comité está de acuerdo con ese deseo. “Hay muchísimas historias allí y necesitamos un vehículo para compartirlas”, le dijo él a ENS en una entrevista reciente.Y agregó, la Iglesia necesita un modo de medir la vitalidad de las congregaciones. Por tanto, el comité propuso en su informe a la Convención, la Resolución A038 que le pide a la Iglesia que cree un “índice de vitalidad congregacional”. La resolución se produjo en parte como respuesta a la Resolución 2012-A010, que le pedía al comité que identificara que nueva información debía añadirse al informe basada en “cambios actuales y realidades nuevas” en la Iglesia.“Si bien el Informe Parroquial de la Iglesia Episcopal contiene datos estadísticos vitales que debemos saber, no es ni la única forma, ni tal vez la mejor, de evaluar la vitalidad congregacional”, dice la explicación de la Resolución A038, haciendo notar que algunas diócesis han añadido una “quinta página” al informe en “un intento de captar una sensación de apasionantes nuevos ministerios y signos de una novedosa y creciente profundidad espiritual, aunque otros parámetros puedan estar estáticos”.El cartel de la página de Facebook del Centro Comunitario del Oeste Kairós resume los objetivos de la organización. El ministerio de Asheville, Carolina del Norte, responde a la iniciativa de 1 año de existencia de “la Iglesia en el mundo” de la catedral de los Fieles Difuntos [Cathedral of All Souls] en Asheville y la Diócesis de Carolina del Norte Occidental. El ministerio, que tiene su sede en una antigua tienda de tejidos en la cada vez más aburguesada Hayward Road de West Ashville, recibió una subvención de Zona de Empresa de Misión. Foto Centro comunitario del Oeste Kairós vía Facebook.El Muy Rdo. David duPlantier, deán de la iglesia catedral de Cristo [Christ Church Cathedral] en Nueva Orleáns, se muestra de acuerdo. “Medimos algo que era importante en 1967 y era importante en 1980 y es importante ahora en alguna medida”, le dijo él a ENS en una entrevista reciente. “Pero la asistencia dominical, los miembros bautizados, cuándo dinero obtenemos de ellos, cuando uno mira a miles de personas que están en nuestros espacios episcopales, que están haciéndose conscientes de nuestra ‘marca’, que tal vez se sienten cómodos al dar otro paso dentro de nuestra comunidad cultual —eso no lo medimos”.Junto con todas las otras razones de encontrar maneras de medir ese ministerio, dijo duPlantier, la otra razón de hacerlo es contrarrestar la impresión de algunos episcopales de que su Iglesia se está achicando y tornándose irrelevante, una impresión con la cual duPlantier no está de acuerdo.(El informe parroquial incluye las cifras de los miembros bautizados y comulgantes activos, el promedio de asistencia dominical, el número total de oficios y sus tipos, la matrícula de la escuela dominical, mayordomía y otra información económica, entre otras cifras estadísticas. Una copia del formato del informe parroquial 2014 se encuentra aquí).Entre tanto, la Comisión Permanente sobre la Misión y Evangelización de la Iglesia Episcopal propuso una revisión diferente al informe parroquial en su informe a la Convención 2013-2015. La Resolución A084 agregaría una sección para que las congregaciones añadan sus actividades en tanto se relacionen con las Cinco Marcas de la Misión. También agregaría una categoría de asistencia llamada Promedio de Asistencia Distinta, definida como la asistencia semanal a todos los oficios de culto no dominicales.La Resolución A084 también le permitiría a comunidades tales como las formadas como zonas de empresa de misión y comienzo de nuevas iglesias empezar a presentar informes parroquiales y a captar algo de la información acerca de esa labor.Para algunos “el alcance del trabajo que han propuesto va a ser mucho más largo que el trienio y va a exigir que ahonden más en la comunidad que lo que la típica comunidad religiosa o iglesia tiende a hacer. Luego, ¿cómo medimos su progreso?”, preguntó Brackett.El comité legislativo sobre vitalidad congregacional tomará en cuenta ambas resoluciones, así como la A085 y la A012, que continuarían la iniciativa de Zonas de Empresa de Misión y Comienzo de Nuevas Iglesias. Todas las resoluciones asignadas al comité hasta la fecha están aquí.¿Cómo se presentaría el proyecto del próximo trienio?Suponiendo que la financiación prosiga en el trienio 2016-2018, Watkins dijo que ella espera que las iniciativas de Zonas de Empresa de Misión y Comienzo de Nuevas Iglesias llevarán a “obispos y su personal, incrementando su capacidad de usar un lenguaje diferente, a aplicar diferentes clases de lentes para mirar las cosas a fin de permitir una mayor libertad” en los comienzos de un ministerio.Y agregó ella, “me gustaría ver que llegan propuestas de lugares de los cuales ni siquiera hemos hablado en este trienio”.Brackett cree que la financiación local para ministerios tales como estos es difícil de conseguir con la actual estructura de la Iglesia, pero está allí. Se pregunta si un grupo de congregaciones podría recaudar el dinero que ascienda al monto que exigen las subvenciones como equiparación y también si se comprometería a aprender a apoyar tales nuevos ministerios de manera regular, con la ayuda de los miembros del personal de la DFMS donde sea adecuado.“Podríamos conseguir muchísimo más de esa manera y podríamos realmente financiar más iniciativas que si acudiéramos estrictamente al presupuesto general diocesano”, apuntó él, añadiendo que el problema de financiar nuevas iniciativas misionales en las diócesis que no tienen dinero para equiparar los fondos podría también abordarse.Spellers le dijo a ENS que ella espera que la iniciativa de Zonas de Empresa de Misión y Comienzo de Nuevas Iglesias no se ve como una iniciativa “de excepción” concebida tan sólo para el trienio 2013-2015.“Esto tiene que ser un proceso continuo de experiencia, de aprendizaje, de desarrollo de nuestra capacidad como pueblo en misión, invirtiendo y esencialmente creando un instrumento de investigación y desarrollo para la Iglesia Episcopal”, afirmó ella. “Uno no puede hacer eso en un solo trienio”.Spellers y Brackett dijeron que esperan más por el entrenamiento de uno en uno de las personas que se sienten llamadas a estos tipos de ministerios. A Spellers le gustaría ver más empeño en evaluar qué tipos de destrezas y dones se necesitan para este tipo de trabajo, así como aprender como Iglesia respecto a la manera de adiestrar a líderes laicos y ordenados en un ministerio empresarial, y formarlos en su quehacer.“Pienso cada vez más en la sostenibilidad y en la manera de crear una infraestructura sana y flexible de manera que estos ministerios puedan en verdad comenzar a despegar para Dios”, añadió.“Estoy asombrada y feliz, y lo que sé es que todos sólo estamos arañando la superficie de lo que es necesario para abarcar la misión en nuestro presente, muchos menos en nuestro futuro”.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events General Convention 2015 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

Anglican Centre in Rome celebrates half a century of reconciliation…

first_img Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Collierville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Archbishop of Canterbury, Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Posted Mar 18, 2016 Submit an Event Listing Comments are closed. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments (1) March 19, 2016 at 7:35 am Congratulations! I just hope the Center also remembers and celebrates the Rt. Reverend Stephen F. Bayne and the work of Edward A. Bayne during the early years… Rector Knoxville, TN Josephine Bayne says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Events Press Release Service Anglican Centre in Rome celebrates half a century of reconciliation ministry Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ecumenical & Interreligious Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Anglican Communion, Meetings between Popes and Archbishops of Canterbury, as seen here when Archbishop Justin Welby met Pope Francis at the Vatican in 2013, are no longer unusual; but the public meeting between Archbishop Ramsey and Pope Paul VI in the Sistine Chapel 50 years ago – on 23 March 1966 – was the first since the Reformation. Photo: Lambeth Palace[Anglican Communion News Service] The historic first official meeting since the Reformation between a Pope and an Archbishop of Canterbury fifty years ago; and with it the dedication of the Anglican Centre of Rome, is being celebrated with a host of events that will take place throughout the year.Pope Paul VI and Archbishop Michael Ramsey met twice on 22 March 1996 and again the following day. The first meeting took place in the morning in the Sistine Chapel. Formal addresses were given and gifts exchanged.The Pope gave Archbishop Ramsey a 12th century fresco of Christ in Glory from a church in the north of Italy. It now hangs in the Crypt Chapel at Lambeth. They met again in the afternoon for private talks in the Pope’s library. The following day there was a service in the Church of St Paul without the Walls during which there was a common declaration and a gift of a ring from Pope Paul VI to Archbishop Ramsey.The meeting paved the way for the creation of the first official process of dialogue between Anglicans and the Vatican since the Reformation – the Anglican Roman Catholic International Commission (ARCIC).The Anglican Centre in Rome was dedicated on 22 March 1966; it opened a few months later. “The Anglican Communion cherishes the Holy Scriptures and the Catholic Creeds,” Archbishop Ramsey said in a short speech at the dedication ceremony. “In history, it values the lessons of the Reformation of the sixteenth century, and it values no less the continuity which it claims with the ancient church.“In spirituality, it learns from saints and teachers of its own, while it also tries to learn from saints and teachers of every period in the West and in the East. In theology, it learns from the Scriptures, the ancient fathers and the liturgy, while it strives to use whatever light is shed by modern knowledge upon the understanding of man and the world.“The Anglican student is often a debtor to writers within the Roman Catholic Church. This Centre is an attempt to repay that debt by making available the resources of Anglican learning to any who will come and enjoy them.”To mark the anniversary of the dedication, a special Eucharist will be celebrated at the Church of St Andrew by the Wardrobe in the City of London. The Celebrant will be the Archdeacon of London, assisted by the associate director of the Anglican Centre in Rome, the Revd Marcus Walker. The former governor of the centre, and current secretary, the Revd Barry Nichols, will preach.Anglicans around the world are being asked to pray for the work of the centre on Sunday 29 May – which has been designated as an Anglican Communion Day of Prayer for the Anglican Centre in Rome. The date has been chosen as the Sunday nearest the feast-day of Saint Augustine of Canterbury.A special choral evensong to mark the anniversary will be held in Westminster Abbey on Tuesday 14 June. The Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, will preach at the service.And a two-day meeting will be held in Rome from Wednesday 5 and Thursday 6 October to mark the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Anglican Centre in Rome by Cardinal Willebrands. Details of the programme for that event will be released later. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more